The Voice, by Paul Fitzgerald and Elizabeth Gould

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                           - 4 -

I also saw in his account the slow and steady mystical
awakening that changed him from being a strict Catholic
prelate into a Merlin-like prophet and I sensed in that
something important for me. He understood that there were
essential meanings missing from our understanding of history
and our place in it, meanings that Western thought had
filtered out. He understood that whether pagan or Christian,
there were secrets to our simultaneous existence in other
realms of reality and that only by listening to our dreams
could we fully understand what was in store for us.

Cambrensis had intended to put them all in a separate
book and call it the "Prophetic history of Ireland." But in
the end he had suppressed them, fearing that "the prophecies
must wait until the right time has arrived."

When I read those words, written by candlelight on a
piece of parchment eight hundred years before my time, a
voice called out to me that the "right time" was now. I
believed that somehow, the eight hundred year old visitor to
my daughter's dream was a messenger. But I had no idea at
the time what that message was, or in the end, the
sacrifices it would require of me to find it. But so, I
began.

Standing on this side of the experience seven years
later, I look back at that time with very different eyes.
The suspicions that had prompted me to feel that "things
were not as they seemed," having been realized beyond my
wildest imaginings. Over these last seven years, new
dimensions of reality have presented themselves, mythic
dreams have become reality and a new multi-dimensional
universe has been opened and explored. It almost seems too
much to believe and all of it might have remained unwritten
and confined to our personal dream world had it not been for
the interest of Oliver Stone. Having gone to him with a
concept for the Voice after the movie JFK we found Stone to
have an avid interest in the power of dreams, having named
his own company IXTLAN after a Carlos Casteneda book on the
subject.