The Voice, by Paul Fitzgerald and Elizabeth Gould

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                           - 6 -

The photograph was of an Irish-American mercenary who'd
found his way to Afghanistan in the 1820's. He'd discovered
the religion of Zoroaster settled in the mountains and
married an Afghan Princess. He lived the real life of
Kipling's fictional Man Who Would Be King and to my
astonishment dressed himself in a plaid uniform with bell
bottoms and a matching turban. It was the eight hundred year
old man from our daughter's dream and Alissa confirmed it
that day quite matter of factly. Afghanistan had been a
profoundly difficult experience to weather, one that seemed
to have had no purpose.

But thanks to Oliver Stone we had begun to find one and
as we assembled Afghanistan the whole picture and my place
in it began to emerge. Sometimes the images were frightening
as I found myself projected into holographic settings that
felt more than real. But as time passed and the voices grew
clearer, I came to realize the entire process was bringing
me home, and that home was the home of my Geraldine
ancestors.

For me personally, I had found the path through
Afghanistan and without knowing it, engaged a mythic quest.
Afghanistan, the seat, the home of the most ancient
civilization had opened a door into another dimension on the
eve of the millennium and I had walked through. The work we
had done for Oliver Stone ultimately revealed itself to be
something far more than just a screenplay. It established a
validity to a mythic dimension that we believe is becoming
more and more important to us as our world reaches a vital
crossroads.

There is nothing in the Voice that is either science
fiction or fantasy. All of the technologies employed and
their applications are already far from the drawing boards
and affecting your lives in ways the waking public has yet
to discover. Within a very short time, holography,
biotechnology and telecommunications will change the idea of
what we think we are, altering the very substance of matter
itself. In fact Cyberspace has already changed the way we
interact with the world and promises to draw us even deeper
into other dimensions long before we even know where we're
going.